Added a geotechnical talk

I added a civil engineering geotechnical talk presented in January 2018 in Edmonton to APEGA (Association of Professional Engineers and Geoscientists of Alberta) entitled:

Civil engineering considerations within the Great Plains Polygonal Fault System

Please click on the title to find the PDF document for the slide show.

These contorted beds are thought to be caused by ‘glacial ice push’. However, examination of wellbore logs shows that the contorted beds exist underground for about 200 m. Therefore, I interpret these beds simply as exposed contorted beds from within the Great Plains PFS at outcrop. If so, this phenomenon should be considered (where applicable) by geotechnical engineers.

These contorted beds are thought to be caused by ‘glacial ice push’. However, examination of wellbore logs shows that the contorted beds exist underground for about 200 m. Therefore, I interpret these beds simply as exposed contorted beds from within the Great Plains PFS at outcrop. If so, this phenomenon should be considered (where applicable) by geotechnical engineers.

Study Launch!

The study is complete except for the formal write-up and some core observations. For example, the proof for the seismogenic initiation of a polygonal fault system is complete. For this, a 5 square mile 3-D seismic dataset encompassing 25 vertical wells from Success, western Saskatchewan was analyzed. These seismic data were graciously provided by Andrew Dyke at TGS Canada Inc.

We will post visually pleasing images here from time-to-time. The adjacent image is from eastern Saskatchewan:

A 3-D seismic timeslice from ~65 m above the reflection corresponding to the Second White Speckled Shale Formation in eastern Saskatchewan; this is approximately the depth of the First White Speckled shale. The average mud crack offset is about 5 m. The faulting initiated in the red area. You can imagine if this faulting is fractal, it is, dimension ~1.8), the 1WS would be fractured and faulted within the entire image.

A 3-D seismic timeslice from ~65 m above the reflection corresponding to the Second White Speckled Shale Formation in eastern Saskatchewan; this is approximately the depth of the First White Speckled shale. The average mud crack offset is about 5 m. The faulting initiated in the red area. You can imagine if this faulting is fractal, it is, dimension ~1.8), the 1WS would be fractured and faulted within the entire image.